FAQ


Frequently asked questions
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1. How does structure-borne sound arise?
2. Which uninsulated or insufficiently insulated pipes must be insulated by 31 December 2006 by the latest?
3. Can the eccentric shape (e. g. Missel compact insulation jackets) be fitted?
4. How must pipes be insulated in the area of hollow space grounds or hanging ceilings?
5. Can pipe insulation be avoided if the warm pipes are laid within insulation brought in by the building contractor (e. g. isolation beneath or above a cellar ceiling)?
6. Do solar cables need to be insulated according to the EnEV?
7. Which insulation layer thicknesses must be adhered to for plastic pipes?
8. Are plastic pipes to be insulated if they are laid in so-called pipe-in-pipe systems with protective coats – in particular for radiator connectors on the pipe floor?
9. Do valves, arches, branch pipes, T-pieces, pipe supports etc., need to be insulated? 


Answers
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How does structure-borne sound arise?
Water which flows through pipes in bath basins, shower trays or through toilet cisterns and washbasins causes vibrations which are strengthened through the resonance of the structure in stereo quality as structure-borne sounds through walls, floors and ceilings in other rooms. The inhabitants therefore have increased noise pollution which, if they are coming out of the toilet or bathroom, increases further. Such life-long “loud-speakers” break the peace of the house day and night.
Which uninsulated or insufficiently insulated pipes must be insulated by 31 December 2006 by the latest?
Uninsulated, accessible heat distribution and hot water pipes and valves which are not situated in heated rooms must be insulated according to Annex 5 of the EnEV.

Can the eccentric shape (e. g. Missel compact insulation jackets) be fitted?
Eccentric pipe insulation may be fitted if the same insulation effect can be produced with increased insulation on the cold side as with a concentric construction (all-around insulation). The equivalence is to be established by the manufacturer.


How must pipes be insulated in the area of hollow space grounds or hanging ceilings?
In this case a concentric construction (all-around insulation) should be fitted to “100%” according to 5, Number 1 to 4. 


Can pipe insulation be avoided if the warm pipes are laid within insulation brought in by the building contractor (e. g. isolation beneath or above a cellar ceiling)?
No, because other isolation levels are not considered according to the provisions of the EnEV.

Do solar cables need to be insulated according to the EnEV?
The goal of the EnEV is to reduce energy use in buildings in order to bring about a reduction in CO2 emissions. Therefore, no legal requirements are placed on the heat insulation of pipes. But since it makes sense to transport the heat produced without great loss, pipe insulation according to the EnEV, Table 1, Annex 5, is recommended. Furthermore, the isolation also protects against contact and protects against possible combustion.


Which insulation layer thicknesses must be adhered to for plastic pipes?
Plastic pipes are involved in the most various constructions, e.g. with respect to material composition, pipe wall thicknesses and thermal conductivity. Because there are so many, not all plastic pipes are standardized. In calculating insulation layer thicknesses, pipe wall thicknesses may be referred to according to the EnEV. But since this would lead to many insignificantly different insulation material thicknesses in the case of the number of plastic pipes, the minimum requirements under the EnEV shall be satisfied with the insulation layer thicknesses for steel or copper pipes.

Are plastic pipes to be insulated if they are laid in so-called pipe-in-pipe systems with protective coats – in particular for radiator connectors on the pipe floor?
In general, so-called pipe-in-pipe systems are also subject to the requirements of the EnEV. Similar to plastic pipes, Annex 5 No. 3 can however also apply here. It says there that: “In the case of heat distribution and warm water distribution, the minimum thickness of the insulation layers according to Table 1 may be reduced insofar as an equal limit of heat loss is ensured with other pipe insulation material requirements and in consideration of the insulation effect of the walls of the pipe.” So if there is evidence from the pipe manufacturer about the insulation effect of the pipe-in-pipe system, this can be referred to in laying out/calculating the insulation layer thicknesses. If there are no requirements for heat insulation according to the EnEV on the basis of an installation situation, insulation cannot be foregone for the following reasons: protection from corrosion, avoidance of clicking and flowing sounds, airborne and structure-borne sound insulation etc. To what extent pipe-in-pipe systems can also satisfy these requirements without additional insulation is to be proven by the manufacturer. 

Do valves, arches, branch pipes, T-pieces, pipe supports etc., need to be insulated?
Yes, shaped pieces and valves count as heat distribution and hot water equipment and must be insulated according to EnEV 2007 § 14, Annex 5, Table 1.